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Common Steps in Community Water Treatment

While the United States of America contains some of the safest drinking water in the world, our consumers should know the process behind community water treatment. These sites mostly provide surface water treatment. If you need specialized work, you should consider buying a unique water filter for your home or business.

The more you understand can help protect your family from waterborne germs and pathogens that do run through people’s water supplies. In recent memory, there was a case of e.coli affecting the well water at CLIMB works in Sevier County.

community water treatment site

COMMUNITY WATER TREATMENT: 4 STEPS

1. Coagulation and Flocculation

In the community water treatment facility, their workers add positively-charged chemicals into the water supply. These positively-charged chemicals react to dirt and particles in the water and that binds the two particles together so they coagulate. When these bigger particles form, they’re called floc.

2. Sedimentation

The floc becomes heavy so it drifts to the bottom of the water supply for ease of separation. This process makes the floc easier to remove compared to the original smaller particles when workers continue into water filtration.

3. Filtration

As a result, the community’s water supply becomes clear on top. The water, then, passes through filters of different compositions like charcoal, gravel, and sand, and different pore sizes to remove dissolved particles. These particles can include dust, parasites, bacteria, viruses, and chemicals that one doesn’t want in their drinking water.

4. Disinfection

The workers will proceed to throw in a disinfectant into the filtrated water supply. For example, the popular choices are chlorine and chloramine, which kills any left-over germs so you can have safe drinking water. While there are safe levels of drinking chlorine in your community water, there are scientists who study the long-term, negative effects of drinking chlorine.

Why Should You Get a Home Water Treatment Unit?

When you purify your water with a home filtration system, you protect your family and friend from harmful toxins. You’ll find that extra chemicals, bacteria, and chlorine does get through community water treatment sites. Even if the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides regulations, they don’t inspect for all contaminants.

If you have a person in your home who has a compromised immune system, it’s best you don’t take the chance for them to fall ill, due to an unclean water supply. The right water filtration system protects your health and makes your drinking water taste great.

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3 Tips for Caring for a Bird Bath in the Winter

Whether you are thinking of implementing a new bird bath in your winter landscape or caring for one you currently have, this article will serve as a guideline to take proper care of it and its guests. Let’s get started.

Know your neighborhood.

It may be helpful to first know the birds that live in your neighborhood and what their migration patterns are. Do the bird species living in your neighborhood overwinter (not migrate at all), and if not, when, in what month do they migrate and when do they return? It’s also helpful to know your region’s weather patterns. When, if at all, do bodies of water freeze?

Buy the best material for withstanding the weather.

Depending on the weather patterns of your winter season, you should choose the appropriate material for a bird bath that will stand the test of time. If water repeatedly freezes and thaws in your region, you should avoid baths made of cement, stone, or glass. The best material, no matter where you live, is plastic or resin. These materials are shatterproof and can take the changes of the season. Dark colors are best because they attract the sun’s warmth.

Keep your bird bath warm using these tips.

  • Strategically place your bird bath to get the most exposure to the sun, the same way you do with house plants.
  • An insulating blanket wrapped around your bath will also aid it in keeping warm.
  • Prevent freezing by using the element of wind. If you place a ball on the top of the water, the wind will keep it moving along the bath and prevent thin layers of ice from forming.
  • Plastic liner products will make it easy to remove any ice that has formed.
  • You can also heat water on the stove, let cool a little, and then pour it into an existing freezing over bird bath to stop the freezing process. Never add boiling water to a bird bath, use excessive force trying to break ice, or antifreeze chemicals or salt. They are not safe for your bird bath or more importantly, your bird friends!
  • And last, but definitely not least, an electric-heated bird bath option is available for purchase, but are the most expensive option. If you live in an extreme weather region, this may be your only option.